Maureen’s away this week, so I’m in sole charge of the blog and admit responsibility for this post; perhaps the power has gone to my head……There were plenty of serious topics about but the Ryder Cup will loom large next week; the leaking of the health records of Justin Rose and Charley Hull and their TUEs (therapeutic use exemptions) is part of a story that will run and run; the Solheim Cup is next year but many congrats to Marta Figueras-Dotti on being named as one of Annika Sorenstam’s vice-captains, another great choice (and already one of our q and a’s); and well done to the Ireland team of Leona Maguire, Olivia Mehaffey and Annabel Wilson, who won the bronze medal in the Espirito Santo in Mexico.  They finished just a shot behind Switzerland, who were a whopping 21 shots behind the champions South Korea.

So, of course, I’m going to muse about headcovers or “those little hat things” as a non-golfing friend calls them.  I’m not alone in finding this subject of interest:  the latest newsletter from the LET has a feature called Head Covers On Tour but I’m not proud and I prefer headcover to be all one word even if the computer doesn’t.  Many of them have names and they all have a story and they don’t complain if you drop them or keep them hanging about during a photo shoot.  The main danger came from Meg, the lovely but bonkers collie next door, who likes to attack the fence if she thinks anything is threatening her side of it.  Good thing she couldn’t see the furry animals being snapped.

Headcovers posing in the garden with Kerikeri the kiwi. Meg the collie is behind the fence!

Headcovers posing in the garden with Kerikeri the kiwi. Meg the collie is behind the fence!

First up is Dornoch, the moose who protects my driver.  He’s a bit heavy and unwieldy so doesn’t get out much but he reminds me of a Canadian friend called Lorne Rubinstein, who once spent a year in Dornoch and wrote a lovely book about it.  Its title is A Season in Dornoch, Golf and Life in the Scottish Highlands, and the foreword is by Sean Connery.

Caradoc, a battered old red dragon that I gave to my husband many years ago, covers the 3-wood and reminds me to douse my fiery temper in a way that Dai rarely did his when he was alive.  I get a lot of practice because it’s a club a bit out of my league and is serviceable rather than spectacular, specialising in the sort of worm burners that irritate the hell out of opponents.

My rescue club has a new cover, as yet unnamed, a retro, old-fashioned looking red and white knitted thing with a big pompom and the Ricoh Women’s British Open trophy on it.  I think I’ll call it Woburn because that’s where I won it, in a press putting/chipping comp conducted by Master Professional Luther Blacklock.  I was chuffed to bits and am very proud of it.

The lion with a multi-coloured mane is a John Daly confection that looks after a precious persimmon driver made for me by a craftsman called Peter Broadbent.  I don’t know if I could hit it now, having got used to drivers with heads at least twice the size but I still love it.  And I love the cover because I bought it in Augusta, from John Daly, who was manning his (very posh) stall in the car park of the Hooters just down Washington Road from the golf club that was then run by Hootie (Johnson, the chairman of Augusta National at the time).  From Hootie’s to Hooters was a very hot trek but worth it.

Dornoch, left, with JD, right and their respective drivers

Dornoch, left, with the John Daly lion, right, and their respective drivers

Lastly but by no means least there’s Gilly the Galah, a pretty ghastly creation that sheds vile pink fibres every time he’s touched.  He still squawks if his beak is pressed but he has pride of place near my front door because our inimitable captain Jayne Fletcher bought us all one when we reached the finals of the Mail on Sunday.  It’s a fantastic team competition that attracts entries from several thousand clubs and is fiendishly difficult to win.  We (Whittington Heath) were beaten by Farnham from Surrey in the final at El Rompido, in Spain – Sale and South Moor were the other semi-finalists – and we all had a ball.  So Gilly, named after the Spurs (and Dundee) legend Alan Gilzean, is, quite simply, the greatest!

Gilly the Galah

Gilly the Galah